Beethoven Piano Sonata 10

Opus 14, No. 2


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Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 First edition

Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 –First Edition

Vienna, 1799.

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"The genie is made up of 2% talent and 98% constant perseverance." –L. V. Beethoven.

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Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 –Interesting Facts

Beethoven's tenth piano sonata is one of those sonatas whose lyricism and soft humor belies his exquisite artistry.


Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 –Novelties

The first movement, for example, has several themes that are certainly different; the first is quite Bachian, the second is typical Viennese, the third is similar to a duet. They are definitely not contrasting in the classic sense of the word. There is a clever rhythmic trick from the opening measure, where the song enters half a beat before you hear it, you will definitely hear the first beat with your left hand, now try to listen to it "correctly and carefully" and the whole movement will transform in your head. , establishing a subtle but definite moment of rhythmic disorientation as the high-pitched melody enters bar four. And in shrewd recognition of this trick, Beethoven actually corrects this misleading rhythm in the coda.

The second movement is the first movement of theme and variation that Beethoven would put in his sonatas, explicitly humorous, although some variations are directly lyrical. The final movement, like the first, begins deep in rhythmic ambiguity, although unlike the first movement, this ambiguity is not hidden. The ingenuity with which Beethoven uses modulations and plays with the rondo form here is quite illustrative, intelligent; the coda, for example, contains the final third episode and the return of the theme. Like the second movement, the third movement has a fun ending, it builds up to a great glossy finish, fades to the bass.